FAQ

Q: Where are you located? Are your products shipping from China?
A: We are an American company shipping from the Chicago area. While few quilting fabrics are made in America these days, our jelly rolls are cut from the bolt, steam-pressed, die-cut and packaged in the US! 
Q: What are the dimensions of a jelly roll strip?
A: Jelly roll strips are 2 1/2" by the width of the fabric, generally 42+". Most manufacturers' fabrics come out to 42" or 44" wide.
Q: Are your strips cut straight and even?
A: Yes! Our rolls are hand-aligned, hand-pressed and then hand-aligned again before being machine cut to 2.5". 
Q: Are your strips pinking-edged or razor edged?
A: Our strips are razor cut (no zig-zags) and snugly packaged immediately to prevent fraying. 
Q: Do the strips need to be washed prior to use? Are your rolls pre-washed?
A: Modern fabric production techniques generally produce fabrics that are colorfast. If you are concerned with a very dark or bright color, simply wash your finished quilt or project in cold water with a color catcher, and immediately transfer to a warm dryer. DO NOT WASH PRECUTS OR PUT THEM IN THE DRYER. Machine washing and drying may unravel strips to the point of being unusable. Hand washing is also not recommended. We do not refund rolls that have been washed in any way.
Q: What size quilt does one roll make?
A: This depends both on the number of strips in your roll, and the pattern you're using! When sewn together side by side using 1/4" seams, 20 strips will make a square approximately 40 inches wide by 40 inches long. A 40-strip roll makes the Jelly Roll Race pattern, which is approximately 50" x 65".
Q: How many rolls do I need to make a _____ size quilt?
A: This depends on the pattern you're using. You can approximate the number of 20-strip rolls you'll need for a certain dimension by using 40" x 40" = 1 20-strip roll as a guide.
So for example, if you want to make a queen size quilt that will be 90" x 90", You'll need somewhere between 5-9 rolls.
Most patterns call for a certain number of strips, so finding a pattern you like that is the size you want is usually the easiest thing to do if you don't want to try to figure out the math! :)